Access exclusive articles by Junko Yoshida

With experts from across the supply chain joining us at AutoSensONLINE, we know that we can look forward to the latest technical discussions in ADAS and AV. But did you know that a Full Pass also includes access to all the content from Brussels on-demand, and a download of exclusive analysis articles by Junko Yoshida, Editor in Chief of The Ojo-Yoshida Report?

Get your ticket to AutoSensONLINE here, and check out excerpts from ‘Robust Sensing: It Takes a Village‘ and ‘It’s Elon’s World. We Just Drive in It‘ below:

Robust Sensing: It Takes a Village by Junko Yoshida

Many traditional suppliers have refrained from highlighting any glaring weaknesses in their sensor modality, but that era of laissez faire has passed. 

As ADAS features proliferate in new models, carmakers face pressures to clarify what their automated functions can or cannot do. Similar pressure should be applied to regulators and testing agencies. Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and EuroNCAP, for example, only evaluate vehicle safety in normal conditions.

If the automotive industry defines ADAS — and really means it — as a system to “assist drivers for better road safety,” it dares not turn blind eye to the inconvenient truth that today’s ADAS vehicles (or AVs) are vulnerable when driving in the dark, into the sun, in fog, heavy rain or snow. Just as human drivers have a hard time driving in bad weather, so do machines…

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It’s Elon’s World. We Just Drive in It by Junko Yoshida

Automakers today are undergoing the biggest upheaval in their industry and market history. Electrification, automation and connectivity are all happening at the same time. In turn, these three unstoppable trends are fundamentally altering the way car OEMs must design, develop, test, validate, manufacture, maintain, and update their cars for their entire life cycle. The culprit that has triggered the revolution is software.

The value of a new car will no longer reside in just how it looks at the time of its rollout. Value, rather, will hinge on how the vehicle evolves over time. Buyers of new cars will more and more expect additional features, functions, apps and services to pop up magically in their cars, via software updates. Individual hardware components still matter. But software that runs on top of them has become crucial in the new generation of automobiles.

Welcome to the brave, confusing new world of software-defined vehicles. For this disruptivechange, credit goes where it’s due: Elon Musk…

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